BAKOVIC BROTHERS SHAKE OFF RIVALRY

In SportsLeave a Comment

Reading Time: 2 minutes

By Ben Fisher

When Igor Bakovic came to play basketball Ryerson, he was set to reign as the court’s king.

And he did for three years — then his baby brother showed up.

Before Boris joined the Rams, Igor led the nation in rebounding, averaging a double-double per game and was the co-captain of Ryerson’s basketball team. But since then, the younger Bakovic has become the poster boy for the basketball team. He is the reigning Male Rookie Athlete of the Year, was selected to the national all-rookie team and was named to Canada’s under-19 men’s national team.

All this makes for a classic sibling rivalry between the brothers Bakovic.

But Igor says his little brother’s success is well deserved and that he is proud of his brother’s achievements.

“I don’t feel overshadowed at all, I’m happy for his successes,” Igor said. “He’s worked hard. He’s my brother and I’m proud of him.”

Glenn Taylor, the men’s basketball coach, doesn’t see a problem with brotherly competition between the Bakovic brothers.

“Both players have entirely different styles,” Taylor said. While Igor is known to be more calm and reserved, Boris often plays with his heart on his sleeve. “They don’t really rival each other, it’s more they compliment each other.”

Overall, the brothers are just happy to be playing with each other at a competitive level. “He was the one who guided me through basketball,” said Boris of his bigger brother. “It wasn’t really planned [playing with Igor at Ryerson] but it worked out that way and it was great.”

However, on the volleyball court, head coach Mirek Porosa said things are a little bit different. Last year the volleyball team had a set of brothers, Greg and Roger Marszalek.

“There is a natural rivalry between the brothers that is obvious and visible,” Porosa said, but added that since the brothers didn’t play the same position, it’s not like they were competing for a spot on the roster.

“That rivalry thing has kind of diminished,” Roger Marszalek said.

“Now it’s more just a silent respect we have for each other.”

Leave a Comment