A is for Apathy

In Frosh /

Between the euphoria of leaving high school and the newfound independence that comes along with living in Canada’s largest city, most university students arrive at Ryerson with a keen sense of passion and excitement for the four years they will spend working on their undergraduate degree. But somewhere in the shuffle that passion often fades into indifference.

After as little as a semester, Ryerson seems to lose its luster as students spend less and less recreational time on campus, only showing up for their classes and the odd exam.

Dubbed a “commuter campus,” a common argument is that the university’s centralized location does not allow for a thriving community because instead of settling downtown and thrusting themselves into the community, a majority of Ryerson’s 20,000 students come from all parts the city with the sole intention of staying as long as they have to . My warning to you: don’t buy into that.

What people don’t really notice is that Ryerson has one of the most diverse and complete student communities in Toronto. Seriously, whether you’re into sports, politics, video games or comic books there’s a club for just about anything you can think of.

Not to mention the fact that our once small campus has practically doubled over the past year. The 2012-13 school year will mark the first time that Ryerson students will have a place they can call home. I’m not saying that the Mattamy Athletic Centre will cure student apathy or make people care more about our school, but what it will do is give students a reason to spend more time on campus and that’s the first step in building a caring community.

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