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Upon Refraction by Rebecca Petro

Broken mirrors mean more than bad luck, they reflect our relationship with the environment. Rebecca Petro’s Upon Refraction, is made of layered mirror fragments and uses reflecting light to symbolize how nature is changing right before us.

“As guilty as I feel saying that I really enjoyed the mild winter, things are really changing now,” Petro said.

Approaching this piece, you will see your reflection placed on a natural landscape. Petro’s goal is to shed light on our connection and detachment to our surroundings. “I started building this thing and it kind of took on a mind of its own.”

CrestFallen by Leif Parker

Something as simple as an egg can evoke feelings of hopelessness. Leif Parker’s CrestFallen creates a realistic scene of an egg that has fallen from its nest. Viewers are left questioning its survival.

“I was trying to find a way to get the most emotional energy out of the least amount of movement,” Parker said.

Calling for close examination by its audience, the piece explores binaries such as life and death, and required actual bird parts to create.

“We are taught not to touch birds because the mother won’t reaccept the baby bird,” said Parker, “There’s a sort of parallel in the art world, where you aren’t supposed to touch art.” [Editor’s note: Parker is the Eyeopener’s fun editor.]

Rear Window by Michael Lawrie and Jon Friis Could

Could a telescope display something other than reality? Michael Lawrie and Jon Friis created one that combines what is visible to the naked eye with scenes from the 1954 Alfred Hitchcock film, Rear Window, which their piece is named after. “We wanted to make an interactive experience that is really engaging,” Lawrie said.

Using augmented reality — reality captured on video and added to afterwards — the artists invite you to look at buildings across the street and view scenes of the film in the place of windows.

“Hopefully they kind of get the idea we were exploring which is taking these extraordinary cinematic scenes and pulling them into reality.”


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