Rye grad’s death unsolved after two years

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Two years ago, Ryerson grad Christopher Skinner was attacked and murdered not far from campus. After the anniversary of his death, Sean Wetselaar looks into how the investigation has progressed

The death of Ryerson graduate Christopher Skinner remains unsolved after two years of investigation, but police still believe someone will come forward with information.

The 27-year-old died on Oct. 18, 2009, from injuries obtained through a violent encounter at the corner of Victoria and Adelaide streets.

Skinner was out celebrating his sister’s 23rd birthday when the occupants of a black SUV assaulted him and then proceeded to run him over.

It was suspected that Skinner, who was openly gay, was the victim of a hate crime.

The investigation regarding Skinner’s death remains open and the Toronto Police Service continues to actively examine evidence and search for the perpetrator.

“No one has been identified as of yet,” said media relations officer, Const. Tony Vella.

“[But] we’re encouraging anyone who has any information on the identity of the killer to come forward.”

There is a reward of approximately $150,000 offered for any information regarding Skinner’s death.

Since 2009, the police have examined video surveillance, cell phone records and Highway 407 billing records.

“I think it’s incumbent on anyone who has any information to come forward,” said detective Stacy Gallant, who has been assigned to the case since 2009.

According to an article published in the Toronto Star in January 2011, only 44 per cent of homicides were solved in 2010. Of the 60 cases reported in 2010, 26 arrests were made.

Gallant added that the police believe the conscience of those with information will eventually compel them to share with 51 Division.

“I know for sure that whoever was responsible for this has told others,” Gallant said.

Despite the amount of time that has passed since Skinner’s death, Christopher’s father, Warren Skinner, believes that the case will be solved.

“I think it’s a matter of time,” he said. “I think it’s a matter of people growing and maturing and relationships changing. Relationships and allegiances will change.”

Gallant also remains positive.

“I’m always confident,” he said. “It just takes time. Regardless of how long it takes, the right information will come to us.”


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